Greg Nesteroff

The old Cascade highway near Rossland is seeing looking down into Sheep Creek in this ca. 1940s postcard.

PLACE NAMES: Sheep Creek

Two noteworthy Sheep Creeks exist in West Kootenay.

The old Cascade highway near Rossland is seeing looking down into Sheep Creek in this ca. 1940s postcard.
An ad from the Kaslo-Slocan Examiner of May 13

PLACE NAMES: Seaton

Seaton might be the most obscure townsite in the Slocan. You won’t find it mentioned in any history book.

An ad from the Kaslo-Slocan Examiner of May 13
This ad for the Sayward townsite appeared in the Nelson Miner on Aug. 12

PLACE NAMES: Sayward

Sayward on Vancouver Island and the former West Kootenay townsite of Sayward were both named after lumber magnate William Parsons Sayward.

This ad for the Sayward townsite appeared in the Nelson Miner on Aug. 12
Two of Sandon’s remaining buildings are seen in the 1960s. The building on the left is now the museum

PLACE NAMES: Sandon, part 2

The earliest reference to the future townsite of Sandon was in a letter by John Morgan Harris, dated May 19, 1892.

Two of Sandon’s remaining buildings are seen in the 1960s. The building on the left is now the museum
Sandon is seen sometime following the fire of 1900 that razed the downtown district. This postcard was mailed in 1907. The town was named after prospector John Sandon.

PLACE NAMES: Sandon, part 1

Sandon, the West Kootenay’s greatest ghost town, was named after Sandon Creek, in turn named for prospector John Sandon.

Sandon is seen sometime following the fire of 1900 that razed the downtown district. This postcard was mailed in 1907. The town was named after prospector John Sandon.
Ads in the Nelson Daily News during the summer of 1910 exalted the many advantages of Salmon Rapids

PLACE NAMES: Salmon Rapids

On July 8, 1910, the Nelson Daily News carried the first in a series of ads for the “First sale of lots in the Salmon Rapids townsite.”

Ads in the Nelson Daily News during the summer of 1910 exalted the many advantages of Salmon Rapids
This ad appeared in the Vancouver Daily World on March 12

PLACE NAMES: Salmo

Salmo is the Latin form of salmon and takes its name from the Salmon River (now Salmo River) that flows through it.

This ad appeared in the Vancouver Daily World on March 12
The hotel at St. Leon Hot Springs is seen above on a ca. 1950s postcard when Ed Gates operated it as the Gates of St. Leon

PLACE NAMES: St. Leon and Rosebery, revisited

In 1892, prospector Mike Grady found hot springs bubbling out of holes in the rocks two miles up a mountainside from Upper Arrow Lake.

The hotel at St. Leon Hot Springs is seen above on a ca. 1950s postcard when Ed Gates operated it as the Gates of St. Leon
The original Rossland townsite plan

Place Names: Postal confusion blamed for Thompson becoming Rossland

One hundred sixty-seventh in an alphabetical series on West Kootenay/Boundary place names.

The original Rossland townsite plan
The Lion’s Head (or Lion’s Bluff

PLACE NAMES: Robson and Rock Creek

Robson honors BC’s ninth premier, John Robson (1824-92), although he never saw his namesake town.

The Lion’s Head (or Lion’s Bluff
Renata as seen from Broadwater Road

PLACE NAMES: Remac and Renata

Remac is a compound name taken from the principal locators of the Reeves MacDonald mining properties.

Renata as seen from Broadwater Road
Queens Bay was named by 1889 and presumably honours Queen Victoria.

PLACE NAMES: Queens Bay, Rambler, and Raspberry

According to Kootenay Outlet Reflections, Queens Bay “received its name before 1883, when the Ainsworth Mining Camp opened.”

Queens Bay was named by 1889 and presumably honours Queen Victoria.
The siding sign remains at Poupore

PLACE NAMES: Poupore, Powder Point, and Power’s Camp

Of the few remaining railway siding signs in this area, Poupore surely ranks as the oddest.

The siding sign remains at Poupore
ABOVE: A plaque unveiled in Ralph West’s honour gave the wrong date — it should have said May 30

15,000 attended Castlegar airport’s opening

Castlegar’s airport appears to have been designated the regional facility for West Kootenay around 1951.

ABOVE: A plaque unveiled in Ralph West’s honour gave the wrong date — it should have said May 30
ABOVE: Many businesses have adopted the name Playmor over the years. BELOW: An ad for Playmor Hall from the Nelson Daily News of Aug. 31

PLACE NAMES: Playmor Junction

Playmor Junction, at the intersection of Highway 6 and 3A, is one of the more recent additions to local toponymy, dating to 1968.

ABOVE: Many businesses have adopted the name Playmor over the years. BELOW: An ad for Playmor Hall from the Nelson Daily News of Aug. 31
The Castlegar airport terminal is seen in the 1950s. Canadian Pacific Airlines was the commercial carrier at the time.

The early Castlegar airport story

West Kootenay’s chief landing strip was born out of both collaboration and controversy.

The Castlegar airport terminal is seen in the 1950s. Canadian Pacific Airlines was the commercial carrier at the time.
The most historic building at Perry Siding is the Threads Guild Hall

PLACE NAMES: Perry Siding

The Slocan Valley community of Perry Siding was likely named for Charles Edward Perry (1843-1906), a civil engineer and land surveyor.

The most historic building at Perry Siding is the Threads Guild Hall
The Paulson Hotel

PLACE NAMES: Paulson and Petersbury

Today Paulson is a bridge, a backroad, and a highway, but originally it was a siding on the Columbia and Western Railway.

The Paulson Hotel
ABOVE and BELOW INSET: The original Park Siding school

PLACE NAMES: Park Siding and Pass Creek

Park Siding, on the Nelson and Fort Sheppard Railway, a few kilometers northeast of Fruitvale, was named for nearby landowner Andrew Park.

ABOVE and BELOW INSET: The original Park Siding school
Greenwood city hall

A look at West Kootenay/Boundary’s local government landscape

Ahead of Local Government Awareness Week in BC, we study the complicated history of municipalities in our area.

Greenwood city hall