Castlegar Artwalk 2013

Artist profiles - four and five, Gayle Edwards and Jacquie Hamilton

'Heron' by Gayle Edwards

Castlegar Artwalk 2013

Artist Bios 4 – 5

Formatted by: April Cuffy

 

ARTIST NAME: Gayle Edwards

VENUE: Glacier Honda (#9)

MEDIUM: Nature Paintings (Acrylic, Watercolour)

CURRENT CITY: Castlegar

HOMETOWN: Prince George

ARTIST STATEMENT:

Being creative has always been a part of my life—I have tried many aspects of creativity including sewing, quilting and others, but painting has always been my favourite since high school. I love to paint things from nature: flowers, birds and animals. I have painted a number of people’s pets and also landscapes. Simple things appeal to me. I like my paintings to be bright, cheerful and hopefully bring a smile to people.

BIO:

My first goal after retiring from some 30 years in the workforce was to take art classes. I began with watercolour classes at the Artist Co-op in Prince George, where I lived at the time. These classes covered basics in watercolour, the colour wheel, values and specifics, painting clouds or rocks, etc. My teacher, Sharon Antonenko, was a well-known Prince George artist.

After living there for many years, we decided to move further south to Castlegar in May 2008 with our family. I was looking for a place to do “drop-in” art classes in Castlegar to continue my painting on a regular basis. Since about 2009I have been attending Mirja Vahala’s Art Mentoring Classes at her Windborne Bed and Breakfast studio. I enjoy doing watercolour and acrylics.

 

 

ARTIST NAME: Jacquie Hamilton

VENUE: Jean’s Material Things (#6)

MEDIUM: Hand-woven “Happy Towels”

CURRENT CITY: Castlegar

BIO AND ARTIST STATEMENT:

I have been weaving since the early 1970s when hand-woven were mostly “lumpy and bumpy.” Over the decades, handcrafted woven items have become finer and controlled—household linens, blankets and rugs, and luxury accessories made from exotic threads.

When the Selkirk Weavers’ and Spinners’ Guild chose a colour wheel of tea towels as their display theme for a conference, I started on an extended exercise in colour. Each unique hand-woven towel features narrow stripes that shift in colour along the length of the fabric. Controlling those shifts and finding other colours that enhance this design seems to be a never-ending quest—and one that never fails to make me happy.

While the result is eye-pleasing, the all-cotton towels are certainly functional and will stand up to repeated use.

Well-crafted examples of Jacquie Hamilton’s work pictured below.