PLACE NAMES: Perry Siding

The Slocan Valley community of Perry Siding was likely named for Charles Edward Perry (1843-1906), a civil engineer and land surveyor.

The most historic building at Perry Siding is the Threads Guild Hall

One hundred forty-eighth in an alphabetical series on West Kootenay/Boundary place names

The Slocan Valley community of Perry Siding — also known as Perry’s Siding, Perry’s, and Perrys — was likely named for Charles Edward Perry (1843-1906), a civil engineer and land surveyor who worked on the Slocan branch of the Columbia and Kootenay Railway. Perry Ridge and Perry Creek were presumably also named after him.

Perry began his career in the city engineer’s office in Ottawa, then went to work on the Intercolonial Railway. He served in the Montreal Squadron of Cavalry during the second Fenian Raid of 1870 and shortly afterward came to BC. He joined the preliminary survey for the CPR mainline and worked on many other railway projects over the next 20 years.

In 1892, Perry formed a land surveying firm in Nelson with John Hamilton Gray and Montagu S. Davys and soon produced Perry’s Mining Map, a stunning piece of artwork that detailed West Kootenay’s geography and mining camps.

He also surveyed Trout Lake City, Bonanza City, New Denver, and Cody, among other local townsites. In 1896-97 the CPR hired him to work on its railway to Slocan City, followed by the BC Southern Railway.

He spent some time in the Omineca district as superintendent of the St. Anthony Exploration Co., a hydraulic mining firm, before heading back east in 1904 to join the survey of the National Transcontinental Railway between Winnipeg and Quebec.

While working in Northern Ontario, he became ill and died on March 15, 1906. Several prominent railway engineers served as pallbearers at his well-attended funeral, included Sir Sandford Fleming.

Perry Siding was originally known as Dearin Siding after Joseph Dearin (1856-1930), who was listed in the 1898 BC directory as a rancher at Lemon Creek. The name first appeared in the Nelson Tribune of Jan. 9, 1900, which recorded Dearin staying at the Sherbrooke Hotel. The final reference, in the Slocan Drill of March 24, 1906 noted the birth of Dearin’s daughter.

This spot was also identified as Proctor Siding on W.A. Brock’s geological survey sheet of West Kootenay in 1900, but this might have been just a mistake, caused by confusion with Procter on Kootenay Lake. James White’s Altitudes in the Dominion of Canada (1901) also lists Proctor Siding as a spot a few miles south of Lemon Creek, but may have relied on Brock’s work.

Brock’s map was also the first to label Perry Ridge, a name adopted by the Geographic Board of Canada on June 30, 1904, which was careful to identify it as “Perry Ridge (not Perry’s Ridge).”

When Charles Perry died, the CPR paid tribute to him by adding Perry Siding to its timetable on May 6, 1906. The Perry Siding post office opened on March 1, 1907 and closed in 1949.

Officialdom had a hard time figuring out what to do with the name. Perry Siding was originally adopted in the 1909 BC Gazetteer as the name of a post office and flag station. In 1956, it was reclassified as a settlement, and in 1986 the name changed to Perrys, a community.

Separately, Perrys was adopted as the name of the railway station in 1955, as identified on CPR timetables. The name was rescinded in 1973 but reinstated in 1976.

Doukhobor settlers called the area Persekovoe (or Periskovoye), Russian for “land of peaches.” But was the name meant to sound like Perry?

According to Jon Kalmakoff of the Doukhobor Genealogy Website, “Persikovoye does indeed translate as ‘place of peaches’ or ‘land of peaches.’ From a Russian grammatical perspective, Persikivoye cannot be a Russianization of Perry. To be so, it would have to be Perivoye, or something similar. That said, the original Doukhobor namers may have chosen it because of its similarity to Perrys.”

The name survives in Perrys Back Rd.

Previous installments in this series

Introduction

Ainsworth

Alamo

Anaconda

Annable, Apex, and Arrow Park

Annable, revisited

Appledale

Applegrove, Appleby, and Appledale revisited

Argenta and Arrowhead

Aylwin

Bakers, Birds, and Bosun Landing

Balfour

Bannock City, Basin City, and Bear Lake City

Beasley

Beaton

Bealby Point

Bealby Point (aka Florence Park) revisited

Belford and Blewett

Beaverdell and Billings

Birchbank and Birchdale

Blueberry and Bonnington

Boswell, Bosworth, Boulder Mill, and Broadwater

Brandon

Brilliant

Brooklyn, Brouse, and Burnt Flat

Burton

Camborne, Cariboo City, and Carrolls Landing

Carmi, Cedar Point, Circle City, and Clark’s Camp

Carson, Carstens, and Cascade City

Casino and Champion Creek

Castlegar, Part 1

Castlegar, Part 2

Castlegar, Part 3

Christina Lake

Christina City and Christian Valley

Clubb Landing and Coltern

Cody and Champion Creek revisited

Champion Creek revisited, again

Columbia

Columbia City, Columbia Gardens, and Columbia Park

Comaplix

Cooper Creek and Corra Linn

Crawford Bay and Comaplix revisited

Crescent Valley and Craigtown

Davenport

Dawson, Deadwood, and Deanshaven

Deer Park

East Arrow Park and Edgewood

Eholt

English Cove and English Point

Enterprise

Erie

Evans Creek and Evansport

Falls City

Farron

Fauquier

Ferguson

Ferguson, revisited

Fife

Forslund, Fosthall, and Fairview

Fort Shepherd vs. Fort Sheppard, Part 1

Fort Shepherd vs. Fort Sheppard, Part 2

Fort Sheppard, revisited

Fraser’s Landing and Franklin

Fredericton

Fruitvale and Fraine

Galena Bay

Genelle

Gerrard

Gilpin and Glade

Gladstone and Gerrard, revisited

Glendevon and Graham Landing

Gloster City

Goldfields and Gold Hill

Grand Forks, Part 1

Grand Forks, Part 2

Granite Siding and Granite City

Gray Creek, Part 1

Gray Creek, Part 2

Gray Creek, revisited

Green City

Greenwood

Halcyon Hot Springs

Hall Siding and Healy’s Landing

Harrop

Hartford Junction

Hills

Howser, Part 1

Howser, Part 2

Howser, Part 3

Howser, Part 4

Hudu Valley, Huntingtdon, and Healy’s Landing revisited

Inonoaklin Valley (aka Fire Valley)

Jersey, Johnsons Landing, and Jubilee Point

Kaslo, Part 1

Kaslo, Part 2

Kaslo, Part 3

Kaslo, Part 4

Kettle River, Part 1

Kettle River, Part 2

Kinnaird, Part 1

Kinnaird, Part 2

Kitto Landing

Koch Siding and Keen

Kokanee

Kootenay Bay, Kraft, and Krestova

Kuskonook, Part 1

Kuskonook, Part 2

Kuskonook (and Kuskanax), Part 3

Labarthe, Lafferty, and Longbeach

Lardeau, Part 1

Lardeau, Part 2

Lardeau, Part 3

Lardeau, Part 4

Lebahdo

Lemon Creek, Part 1

Lemon Creek, Part 2

Lemon Creek, Part 3

Makinsons Landing and Marblehead

McDonalds Landing, McGuigan, and Meadow Creek

Meadows, Melville, and Miles’ Ferry

Midway

Mineral City and Minton

Mirror Lake and Molly Gibson Landing

Montgomery and Monte Carlo, Part 1

Montgomery and Monte Carlo, Part 2

Montrose and Myncaster

Nakusp, Part 1

Nakusp, Part 2

Nashville

Needles

Nelson, Part 1

Nelson, Part 2

Nelson, Part 3

Nelson, Part 4

Nelson, Wash.

Nelway and New Galway

New Denver, Part 1

New Denver, Part 2

Niagara

Oasis and Oatescott

Ootischenia

Oro

Park Siding and Pass Creek

Passmore

Paterson

Paulson

Just Posted

VIDEO: Burning truck in Castlegar spews smoke and sparks

Burning truck in Castlegar spews smoke and sparks

Columbia River Treaty to be renegotiated in early 2018

News came in a Tweet from the U.S. Department of State

City of Castlegar hires former CAO as airport consultant

John Malcolm has been hired on a six-month contract to act on the city’s behalf on airport matters.

Castlegar Fire Department Toy Drive raises over $1,100 for food bank

The Castlegar Fire Department held its 35th annual Toy Drive at the Castlegar A&W on Saturday.

Millennium Park Concession had a successful year

Profits up as Castlegar park visitors consume 2300 pounds of potatoes.

Me Too At Work: Sexual assault and harassment in the B.C. workplace

Introducing an in-depth look at who is affected and what can be done

Holiday Train rocks into Castlegar

Local foodbank receives $10,000 at event.

Proposed snowmobiles along Sicamous roads concern RCMP

RCMP, ICBC and province not yet on-board with proposed off-road bylaw in the B.C. Interior

‘Assemble your own meal’ kits grow into $120M industry in Canada

Kits offer a middle ground between eating out and grocery shopping

Millennials closing in as B.C.’s biggest wine drinkers

Generation X leads the way in current consumption of B.C. wine, as more wine drinkers are enjoying local varietals

Canadians lag behind Americans in giving to charity

Only one-in-five Canadians donated to charities in 2017

B.C. children adoption rates lagging, despite increased funding: watchdog

More than 1,000 children children are still waiting to be adopted, new report shows

FortisBC to lower natural gas rates in 2018

Rate changes to impact the Lower Mainland, Kootenays, Interior and Vancouver Island

Four-month-old baby girl critically injured in Toronto

Baby, a man and a woman in serious condition

Most Read