Sandon’s central business district grew up on the first townsite addition, surveyed in 1895 on Johnny Harris’ Loudoun mining claim. Courtesy Regional District of Central Kootenay

PLACE NAMES: Kaslo and Sandon neighbourhoods

Narrow valley saw Sandon’s main street over a creek

A series on West Kootenay/Boundary place names

Last week we started looking at Kaslo’s various neighbourhoods and additions, covering the original townsite surveyed in 1891; the McDonald and Allen Additions, both surveyed soon after on upper benches; as well as Rand and Miller’s Addition to the south, and North Kaslo, neither of which gained much traction.

• Due west of McDonald’s Addition was Bucke and Lee’s Addition, which appears on a map of the region compiled by Charles E. Perry in 1895. It never amounted to anything and might not have even been surveyed.

The namesakes, however, were lawyer Horace W. Bucke (1861-1945) and miner-turned-realtor Benjamin H. Lee (1861-1900), who were also partners in Kaslo’s Washington Hotel. Lee was killed in the Boer War.

Today the area is known as Zwicky Road, after William Edward Zwicky (1858-1929), manager of the Rambler-Cariboo and Cork-Province mines. Zwicky also had a stop on the Kaslo and Slocan Railway named for him.

• North of the original Kaslo townsite but south of the North Kaslo addition was land that belonged to George T. Kane, which doesn’t seem to have a name, although several homes were built there beginning in the 1890s.

This area includes Maple Avenue, Washington Street North, Seventh Street, Rainbow Drive, Boundary Avenue, Larch Drive, and Hillside Avenue. Highway 31 also cuts through it.

• An online BC Assessment map shows vestigial portions of the original townsite east of the Kaslo Golf Club along with another small addition to the south, but it’s not known when it was surveyed or what it was called.

When Kaslo incorporated in 1893, city limits were restricted to an area only slightly larger than the original townsite. None of the additions we’ve discussed were ever added, although the boundaries did expand to include the airstrip west of town.

Additionally, the Village of Kaslo owns the gravel pit west of the airstrip, the cemetery, and the water treatment plant which are all outside village boundaries.

The names of the McDonald and Allen subdivisions remain in limited use, but mostly the community is simply divided into Upper Kaslo and Lower Kaslo.

• A more modern subdivision is Kaslo Heights, which includes Balfour Avenue, Duthie and Carol Streets, Harkness Avenue, Fifth Street and Balfour Crescent. It was built beginning in the late 1970s and was also known as the Jack Hale subdivision after its developer, John Arthur Hale (1914-2009).

Hale also developed the Pineridge Estates subdivision, between Kaslo and Mirror Lake, beginning in the early 1980s.

• Kaslo South Road is usually referred to simply as the Back Road. It follows what was formerly 12th Street through the Rand and Miller Addition.

SANDON NEIGHBOURHOODS

Surveyor John Hirsch laid out the original Sandon townsite in 1893 on Robert Lemon’s Blue Jay mining claim without much regard for topography. Its tidy grid consisted of Reco, CPR, Sandon, Slocan, and Star streets.

The Kaslo and Slocan Railway needed part of the townsite for its right-of-way, which resulted in the company paying Lemon and his partners compensation.

• In 1895, John Fielding surveyed the First Addition to Sandon on Johnny Harris’ Loudoun mining claim, extending Reco Street and adding Ivanhoe, Ruth, and Slocan Star streets — all named after local mines. The town’s principal business district grew up on this addition.

Because the valley was so narrow, the streets were 30 feet wide or less. Carpenter Creek flowed through the middle of town and was subsequently flumed. After a devastating fire in 1900, the primary thoroughfare was moved from Reco Street to the flume, which was renamed Main Street.

• In 1896, John Hamilton Gray laid out East Sandon, which created lots along what was dubbed Cody Road. This area became better known as the Gulch.

• John Fielding surveyed the Sunny Side (or Sunnyside) Addition in 1898, adding lots on a terrace above the Kaslo and Slocan Railway on the north side of town. Sunnyside was already a distinct residential neighbourhood by 1896, and became home to the school, hospital, and two churches.

• A.R. Heyland laid out West Sandon in 1900, extending Reco and Main streets.

• Heyland also surveyed an addition to East Sandon in 1900, extending Cody Road and adding Mill Street and Cody Lane.

Capitol Hill was a residential neighbourhood adjacent to the Kaslo and Slocan Railway, mostly within the original townsite plan of 1893.

Huckleberry Lane was a collection of hillside shanties on the south side of town. The name was in use by the early 1920s.

Today maps show Sandon’s remaining streets as Slocan Star and Galena, plus Mill Lane, Sandon Road (or Sandon Cody Road), and Powerhouse Road. Signs also denote Reco, Ivanhoe, First, and Second streets.

— With thanks to Elizabeth Scarlett, Kootenay Lake Historical Society and Hal Wright

 

The original Sandon townsite, laid out in 1893 on the Blue Jay mining claim, was a neat and tidy grid of streets that did not reflect the actual topography. Courtesy Regional District of Central Kootenay

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