Twin Rivers Elementary School and Robson Community School students compete in the Eco-Challenge

Grade 6 kids to measure how their homes and schools use resources

Mrs. Evdokimoff's grade 6 class at Twin Rivers Elementary School were involved with the Wildsight Eco-challenge.

Wildsight’s Beyond Recycling program is teaching kids in Castlegar and Robson how to shrink their footprints—their Ecological Footprints.

The kids of Mrs. Evdokimoff’s Grade 6 class at Twin Rivers Elementary School and Mrs. Minor’s Grade 6 class at Robson Community School are starting a month-long survey of how their homes and schools use resources—energy, water, goods—and what they can do to improve the numbers.

The kids will investigate how big a footprint their daily lives have,” said Monica Nissen, Wildsight’s Education Program Manager. “They’ll measure things like electrical and gas use and find ways to reduce it. They’ll add up the kilograms of garbage and find ways to recycle more. It’s an intensive process, but they’re ready to tackle it.”

The students are taking part in the 22-week Beyond Recycling curriculum, which is the only program of its type in the Columbia Basin. Working with the classroom teacher, Beyond Recycling educator Jess Thomson outlines the key concepts of energy and water use and works to find ways to reduce waste. “The students have learned how to make better choices when it comes to using resources in their homes. The parents are excited to see the lower utility bills, and competing with another school in the challenge also adds a level of competition and responsibility to the student’s actions. It’s a win-win situation for everyone involved!”

In Beyond Recycling, students learn how their lifestyles use and impact resources and land.

We all use land, water, energy and raw materials to meet the needs of our daily lives,” Nissen said. Where are we missing an opportunity to use less? Let’s find the gaps and fill them in with responsible choices.”

During the Beyond Recycling curriculum, (which meets BC Ministry of Education learning outcomes for science,) students study the ‘lifecycle’ of everyday items, the resources used to make them, and the various sources of energy used for heat, light and transportation.

The Eco-Challenge lasts four weeks. Students in Mrs. Evdokimoff’s and in Mrs. Minor’s class will complete their challenge on February 21.

After students and families investigate, they set commitments to take action,” Nissen said. “For one month, students will do a variety of things at home to save energy, reduce waste, reduce water use, and contribute less carbon emissions to the atmosphere.”

Wildsight acknowledges our generous partners and funders who support the Beyond Recycling program: Regional District of Central Kootenay, Columbia Basin Trust, FortisBC, BC Hydro, National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and Waste Management Inc.

30—

About

Wildsight • www.Wildsight.ca

Wildsight works locally, regionally and globally to protect biodiversity and encourage sustainable communities in Canada’s Columbia and southern Rocky

Mountain region.

This area is internationally recognized as a keystone to conservation in western North America.

 

 

Just Posted

Castlegar family in need of ‘Christmas miracle’ to treat 4 year old’s diabetes

All Jack Sekel wants for Christmas is a monitor that neither insurance or government will provide.

KBRH on watch for bed bugs after two recent cases

Spokesperson Mandy Lowery says there has not been a bed bug sighting at KBRH since Dec. 8

Goalie from Castlegar grabs lacrosse league MVP award

Kyle McIntosh also selected top goalie at Thompson Okanagan Junior Lacrosse League Awards

Kootenay Gallery of Art offers hand-made gifts

Christmas at the Gallery is open seven days a week.

Avalanche Canada issues special public warning

Very weak layer buried under recent snow a cause for concern

VIDEO: Royals reveal the images on their Christmas cards

Prince William and his wife Kate are shown outside in casual clothes, their three young children in tow

Kootenay woman victim of a broken health system

Breast cancer patient left to fight disease alone after being denied referral to Calgary

ICBC to apply for 6.3% hike to basic insurance rates

Crown Corporation said it will be submitting its next basic rate application to the British Columbia Utilities Commission Friday

Media, robotics, Indigenous studies coming to B.C. Grade 12 classrooms in 2019-20

Provincial tests are also being changed for students in Grade 10 to 12, the Education Ministry said

Stranded B.C. trucker writes final wishes before being rescued 3 days later

‘I was just praying someone would come along’

Canfor Corp. extending temporary curtailment of sawmills in B.C.; cutting hours

Vancouver-based company says the decision is due to declining lumber prices, high log costs and log supply constraints

Canada’s prospective world junior team members await final roster decisions

Thirty-four players were invited to the national junior selection camp

Final phase of Kelowna hospital cardiac centre completed

Finishing new recovery rooms marks completion of $381 million project

Family searching for B.C. professor last seen at Colombian salsa club

Ramazan Gencay, a professor in economics at Simon Fraser University, was last seen in Medellin

Most Read