Comedian Brett Butt is coming to the Capitol Theatre on May 13.

Brett Butt explores the language of comedy

Canadian comedian Brent Butt doesn’t always know ahead of time what he’s going to say on stage.

Will Johnson

 

West Kootenay Advertiser

 

Canadian comedian Brent Butt doesn’t always know ahead of time what he’s going to say on stage. He’s amassed a significant arsenal of comedic content, drawn from 27 years of touring experience, but he doesn’t like to plan ahead.

“What I do onstage is kind of determined by what the crowd is into,” Butt told the Advertiser. “You pack hundreds of individuals into a space together and that’s a brand new animal that’s never existed before. The fact that every night it’s different is what keeps it fresh and exciting. All these years later and I’m still in the wings not knowing.”

But things have evolved somewhat different since he started out with his career.

“In the early days you have to do shows in rooms where you know there’s a legitimate threat of physical altercation. Stripper joints, biker bars. You’re thinking ‘I might get knifed here’ and a few times I had to leave through the kitchen.”

Hopefully nothing of the sort will happen when Butt brings his act to the Capitol on May 13 at 7:30 p.m. Butt said fans of his hit show Corner Gas will recognize his comedic sensibilities, but his stand-up routine is significantly different than his show.

“Making TV is a very collaborative thing, it’s a team sport. There are some similar sensibilities in my act — I was the one responsible for the tone of the show — but this will be less joke-jokes and more wordplay, fun with language. I like to find something new in the mundane.”

He said he’s fascinated by ordinary conversation.

“Rural colloquialisms fascinate me, but prim and proper, erudite language is also interesting to me. I like when those two merge. Any time I can get in that sweet spot, when I’m mixing sophistication with blue collar buddy comedy, that’s what I’m looking for.”

These days Butt, who has amassed a number of awards for his work, is primarily pouring his attention into his newly formed Sparrow Media Company.

“We named it Sparrow because it’s a bird that doesn’t feel the need to fly south. This has been exciting transition for me because up until now I’ve only worked on things I’ve created, but now I’m opening the company to work with other creatives who have brought me ideas.”

He said he loves having a chance to collaborate.

“These are people I know and respect who have projects that have legs, and I’m interested in bringing them to life. Maybe I can open some doors they can’t. It sounds more altruistic than it actually is though—really, working with creatives makes me feel good.”

 

The show will also feature special guest Jamie Hutchinson. All seats are reserved and tickets are $42.50. The show is a presentation of the Kootenay Concert Connection.

 

 

Just Posted

Good fencing makes good neighbours— especially when your neighbours are bears

Workshop in Pass Creek this weekend to promote benefits of proper protection for livestock

Castlegar daycare selected for universal childcare pilot program

MLA Katrine Conroy presents letter of acceptance to the program to the Children’s Centre at Selkirk College

Trail police release image of liquor store robber

The video surveillance image shows the robber aiming a black gun at the store’s clerk

Columbia Avenue paving scheduled for weekend

Paving on Castlegar’s main thoroughfare will take place in a few days, weather permitting.

Kootenay region posts 10-per-cent return rate on electoral reform ballots

As of Nov. 13, only 5.3 per cent of ballots had been returned province-wide

People flocking to Vancouver Island city to see hundreds of sea lions

Each year the combination of Steller and California sea lions take over Cowichan Bay

Protesters confront Environment Minister in B.C.

Protesters wanting more for killer whales confront Catherine McKenna

Humans reshaping evolutionary history of species around the globe: paper

University of British Columbia researcher had the paper published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society

Toronto ‘carding’ activist Desmond Cole stopped by police in Vancouver

Cole says his experience reveals what daily life is like for black and Indigenous residents

Commercial trucks banned from left lane of Coquihalla

B.C.’s Ministry of Transportation has introduced a new program that hopes to prevent accidents and closures on the Coquihalla Highway.

B.C. on track to record same number of overdose deaths as last year

128 people died of overdoses in September, bringing the total to more than 1,100 so far in 2018

B.C. firefighters rescue horse stuck in mud

‘It happens more often than you’d think,’ says deputy chief

Canadians more prepared for weather disaster than financial one: poll

RBC recommends people check their bank app as often as the weather app

B.C. dog owner sues after pet killed in beaver trap

A Kamloops man is suing the operator of a trapline north of the city after his dog died

Most Read