Brandon Trotter (right) accepted his award from Cardus President/CEO Michael Van Pelt and the Ross and Davis Mitchell Foundation Chair Davis Mitchell. (Submitted photo)

Castlegar native Brandon Trotter wins Ross and Davis Mitchell Prize for Faith and Writing

Brandon Trotter won for his short story Saint 148.

A Castlegar native has won The Ross and Davis Mitchell Prize for Faith and Writing.

Brandon Trotter was awarded the $10,000 prize for his short story Saint 148. The story is a futuristic piece about a robot who desires to serve God and the deacon it comes to for help in its journey of faith.

The Ross and Davis Mitchell Prize for Faith and Writing is a new prize developed by the think tank Cardus. According to its website, it was designed to help give voice to the myriad of religions that make up the social landscape of Canada and to help “re-awaken Canadians to the powerful truth, goodness, and beauty that belief brings into our shared lives.”

“I am very honoured,” said Trotter. “I have been trying to have this piece published for three years. It is a very small chunk of society that cares about science fiction and faith, so it is a very niche market.”

“For me, it was exploring whether or not Christianity is truly an altruistic faith,” said Trotter of his story. “At the end of the day, no matter what we give up or who we serve, we get heaven — we get the ultimate reward. I wanted to explore what would this faith look like from somebody who has no soul, who has no guarantee of salvation.”

Trotter graduated from Stanley Humphries in 2005. He attended theatre school and worked as an actor before graduating from Ambrose University. He currently lives in Calgary and serves as the director of art and story and the arts chaplain for Rock Pointe Church.

Trotter has written a number of plays and has a few novels on the go. One is a steam-punk adventure involving an aristocratic British family. The other is a child-centered adventure he is writing for his own children.

Saint 148 can be found at www.faithincanada150.ca/assets/files/team/Brandon%20Trotter.pdf.

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