Ron Broda putting on the lining for his prosthetic leg at his North Saanich home. Broda announced earlier this month that he is running for the People’s Party of Canada. (Black Press Media file photo)

Ron Broda putting on the lining for his prosthetic leg at his North Saanich home. Broda announced earlier this month that he is running for the People’s Party of Canada. (Black Press Media file photo)

Ex-B.C. cop who lost leg in collision is running against Elizabeth May

Ron Broda is running in the Saanich-Gulf Islands riding for the People’s Party of Canada

A former police officer who lost his leg after being struck by a vehicle at Victoria’s Ogden Point is running for the People’s Party of Canada in the Saanich-Gulf Islands riding.

“I decided to run in this year’s federal election simply because I cannot vote for the other options available,” said Ron Broda on Facebook announcing his candidacy. Since ‘none of the above’ was an option, Broda said he decided to offer himself as a “viable alternative” for voters, who “like me, don’t like the other choices.”

RELATED: Ron Broda waiting for a leg up on the Saanich Peninsula

Broda said in a later interview that he used to be a Progressive Conservative, before becoming disillusioned with the party in eventually joined the People’s Party of Canada under Maxime Bernier, who founded the party after losing the leadership contest for the Conservative Party of Canada. “His values and vision resonated with me,” he said.

Broda said he is running with the goal to restore trust between the political class and the public. He also expressed frustration with the current political culture. “People seem to take offence at the slightest things,” he said, adding that he would like to see an “open and honest” discussion about the issues without the risk of being mis-labelled.

But he declined to give a specific example of a statement that politicians would not be allowed to air in the public.

He also defended Bernier’s criticism of multi-culturalism. “We are all Canadians regardless of ethnic and religious backgrounds,” he said. “I’m a Canadian first and we should all be Canadians first,” he said.

Broda is running against incumbent and federal Green Party leader Elizabeth May. “I don’t think she has considered all the evidence related to climate change,” he said, pointing to what he calls a “significant” amount of evidence that contradicts prevailing scientific views on the subject. “Climate change is real,” he said. “There is no question about it.” But if humans are having a effect, it is not clear if they bear full responsibility for it or if they are just one factor among many, he said. “It’s matter of degree.”

Broda lost his leg in July 2013 after an SUV struck him while he was riding his motorcycle. Broda, who said he has no memory of the crash, later sued the driver of the SUV, claiming he had been deliberately struck. The driver received 60 days in jail and a driving prohibition of five years in October 2016, after being found guilty of dangerous driving causing bodily harm. In September 2017, a court upheld this sentence.

But that’s not the only crash Broda has been involved in that has made headlines. In 2006, while driving an 18-wheeler, Broda struck a six-year-old walking on Blanshard Street. The collision left the boy with crushed legs and other injuries. Broda has publicly acknowledged the pain he has caused because of this incident.

According to his professional online profile, Broda currently works as a teacher and speaker, offering workshops, seminars, and other personal growth services.

Before this current career, Broda spent 14 years with the Vancouver Police Department, 14 years with the Saanich Police Department and seven years with the Canada Border Services Agency.

The events of 2013 loom large in Broda’s profile.

“That experience drove home to me how precious and uncertain that life can be. I have a much greater appreciation for living each day to the fullest. I have a greater sense of urgency to accomplish what I am meant to with my life,” he writes.

Also running in Saanich–Gulf Islands are Liberal Ryan Windsor, Conservative David Bush, and New Democrat Sabina Singh.

wolfgang.depner@peninsulanewsreview.com


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

The body of Brenda Ware, 35, was found along Highway 93 in Kootenay National Park on Thursday, May 6, 2021. (RCMP handout)
RCMP ask for tips after woman’s body found in Kootenay National Park

Brenda Ware was found along Highway 93 in the park, 54 kilometres north of the town of Radium

Caden Tart and Luke Geisbrecht host Scratch the Scripture. Photo: Submitted
Two Castlegar teens launch faith podcast

Scratch the Scripture aims to answer teen’s questions about God

Interfor’s Castlegar mill is getting $35 million in upgrades. Photo by: John Boivin
Interfor to invest $35 million at Castlegar mill

Project will enhance productivity and competitiveness

Cliffe Churches helped create the Robson Fire Department. Photo: Submitted
Robson Fire Department honours Cliffe Churches

Cliffe Churches helped create the Robson Fire Department

(The Canadian Press)
Trudeau won’t say whether Canada supports patent waiver for COVID-19 vaccines

‘Canada is at the table to help find a solution’

RCMP are looking for information on an alleged shooting attempt near an elementary school in Smithers March 10. (Phil McLachlan/Capital News/Stock)
UPDATE: Man killed in brazen daylight shooting at Vancouver airport

Details about the police incident are still unknown

Pieces of nephrite jade are shown at a mine site in northwestern B.C. in July 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Tahltan Central Government MANDATORY CREDIT
Indigenous nation opposes jade mining in northwestern B.C.

B.C.’s Mines Act requires operators to prepare a plan to protect cultural heritage resources

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

People pass the red hearts on the COVID-19 Memorial Wall mourning those who have died, opposite the Houses of Parliament on the Embankment in London, Wednesday, April 7, 2021. On May 3, the British government announced that only one person had died of COVID-19 in the previous 24 hours. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Kirsty Wigglesworth
For a view of a COVID-19 future, Canadians should look across the pond

Britain, like Canada, is one of the only countries in the world to delay second doses for several months

Edmonton Oilers’ Connor McDavid (97) celebrates his 100th point this season with Leon Draisaitl (29) against the Vancouver Canucks during second period NHL action in Edmonton on Saturday, May 8, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
Edmonton superstar McDavid hits 100-point mark as Oilers edge Canucks 4-3

NHL scoring leader needs just 53 games to reach century mark

Nuns of Mother Teresa’s Missionaries of Charity, carry some of her relics during a vigil of prayer in preparation for the canonization of Mother Teresa in the St. John in Latheran Basilica at the Vatican, Friday, Sept. 2, 2016. In which city did she do much of her charitable work? (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
QUIZ: How much do you know about these motherhood issues?

In honour of Mother’s Day, take this 10-question quiz

Most Read