Justin Plosz, right, is under fire for throwing a massive house party in Anmore. (Instagram)

1,700 cans, 526 oz of whiskey, helicopters but no arrests at B.C. village house party

RCMP say no laws were broken at the ‘rather large’ party

Police say no arrests were made at a raucous party in Anmore over the weekend that had neighbours upset.

The party was hosted Saturday by Justin Plosz, the owner of Public Relations Canada.

Plosz’ event had helicopters landing on the Birch Wynde property, along with luxury cars, bikini models and plenty of things to to drink.

In an Instagram post, Plosz said the party had 1,700 cans of beer, 526 ounces of whiskey, 333 people, 7 supercars, 5 hyper cars “and a Ploszy in a partree.”

But police say thats not all that happened.

Speaking at a press conference Wednesday, Cpl. Michael McLaughlin said police were called to the party at 5:30 p.m.

“We did get a call for a noise complaint,” McLaughlin said, describing the party as “rather large.”

Police issued a bylaw warning but returned to the party two hours later

“RCMP were called back to the scene for an overdose,” said McLaughlin.

“The person was revived and refused further treatment.”

The victim did not tell police what drugs they were taking, he said.

“For both of these calls, no arrests were made and no bylaw violations were issued,” McLaughlin said.

He defended the police’s actions in not shutting down the party or making any arrests, saying the hosts were willing to turn down the music due to the noise complaint.

“There have been a lot of other online rumours about drug and alcohol abuse or other activities. As police, we cannot act on rumours or things that happen on social media,” McLaughlin.

“We must follow evidence.”

Speaking to the overdose, McLaughlin said “it is not generally our practice to make an arrest at an overdose.”

Some neighbours were angry, but a post on an Anmore community page was largely amused.

“What, no invite?!” one man posted.

“Hahahaha. You caused quite the stir! Good job brotha! Lol” read another.

Some were upset by the low-flying helicopters, three of which landed on the property but McLaughlin said no laws were broken.

“It is not illegal to land a helicopter at a private residence with the permission of the homeowner,” said McLaughlin.

“Even issues like nudity on a private property are not illegal.”


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

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