Premier John Horgan speaks to Union of B.C. Municipalities convention in Whistler, Sept. 14, 2018. (Katya Slepian/Black Press)

B.C. to spend $1.1 billion to retrofit social housing for safety, energy savings

The initiative will focus on increasing the use of cleaner energy in 51,000 units

The British Columbia government says it will invest $1.1 billion over the next decade to make social housing in the province more energy efficient, less polluting, safer and cost efficient.

Premier John Horgan says the $400-million retrofit component of the initiative will focus on increasing the use of cleaner energy in 51,000 units of publicly funded and owned social housing.

Horgan says by retrofitting how those homes are heated, greenhouse gas emissions in some buildings could be cut by 50 per cent and residents would save on their heating bills.

The initiative includes upgrades that would improve building efficiency and reduce energy use, like boiler and electrical upgrades, replacing doors and windows and repairing building envelopes.

Horgan says in addition to building more housing, there’s a need to take better care of the social housing already available.

The Pembina Institute, a clean energy advocate, says in a statements the investment is an affordable and energy efficient way to help some of our most vulnerable people.

“It will also stimulate innovation in the retrofit market, making it easier to upgrade the rest of the housing stock,” says Tom-Pierre Frappe-Seneclauze, director of building and urban solutions at the institute.

“Preparing all of our existing homes and buildings for the clean future will be B.C.’s next megaproject, creating jobs in all communities,” he says.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Castlegar skater heading to BC Winter Games

Taylor Singer will be competing Feb. 20-23 in Fort St. John.

COLUMN: Are invasive plants bugging you? There’s a biocontrol solution

By Tiffany Muncaster and Rylan Pretty Plants that don’t naturally occur in… Continue reading

Castlegar march ensures missing, murdered aboriginal women not forgotten

About 60 people took part in the Valentine’s day memorial

PLACE NAMES: West Kootenay(s)

To some locals, “West Kootenays” (as opposed to West Kootenay) is like nails on a chalkboard

Midway mill shutdown expected to last 8 to 10 weeks

Vaagen Fibre Canada cites low inventory, road restrictions as reason for shut down

VIDEO: Ottawa wants quick, peaceful resolution to pipeline protests, Trudeau says

The protests have manifested themselves as blockades on different rail lines across the country

Wet’suwet’en and B.C. government have been talking Aboriginal title for a year

Coastal GasLink says it has agreements with all 20 elected First Nations councils along the 670-kilometre route

Trudeau tightlipped on plan to end protests ‘quickly and peacefully’

The prime minister, who cancelled a two-day trip to Barbados this week to deal with the crisis at home

Gord Turner: Being a lover on Valentine’s Day

Columnist looks at Valentine’s Day ideas

LETTERS: NATO a force for peace and stability

Writer responds to comments from recent Global Day of Action at the Castlegar United Church.

B.C. budget expected to stay the course as economic growth moderates

Finance minister said ICBC costs have affected budget

Canadian standards for coronavirus protection to be reviewed, health agency says

The protocols set out how health workers should protect themselves and their patients

Monday marks one-year anniversary of man missing from Langley

42-year-old B.C. man, Searl Smith, was last seen leaving Langley Memorial Hospital on Feb. 17, 2019

BC Ferries sailings filling up Family Day Monday

More than 20 sailings added between Swartz Bay and Tsawwassen for long weekend

Most Read