Nearly 300 people from communities throughout the Basin attended the 2010 Columbia Basin Symposium (above). The 2013 Symposium will be held in Creston this October.

CBT Symposium set for October in Creston

Public meeting offers chance for public to provide input into community planning.

Basin residents are invited to connect with each other at the 2013 Columbia Basin Symposium, to be held October 18 to 20 in Creston. This event will focus on “Community Change Through Collaborative Action” and is hosted by Columbia Basin Trust (CBT).

“Many of the complex issues facing our communities require collaboration across a broad range of organizations and agencies,” said Greg Deck, CBT Board Chair. “The Symposium is an opportunity for Basin residents to network, learn ways to enhance collaborative efforts and mobilize the forces that will create a difference in our region.”

The keynote speaker will be Paul Born, President and Co-founder of Tamarack: An Institute for Community Engagement, which helps people collaborate, and achieve collective impact on complex community issues. He is the author of the bestselling Community Conversations: Mobilizing the Ideas, Skills and Passion of Community Organizations, Governments, Business and People.

Along with other presenters, the event will also feature Ray Bollman of the Rural Development Institute of Brandon University. Ray is the former Chief of the Rural Research Group of Statistics Canada and a focus of his research interests is the socio-economic aspects of rural populations.

The Symposium will also be an opportunity to learn more about the work CBT is doing in the region and to provide input into its current planning initiatives. In addition, an evening of cultural entertainment featuring local and Basin talent will be open to the public on Saturday evening. Watch CBT’s website for details to come.

Symposium registration will open in early September and space is limited. The Symposium is free of charge.

For more information visit www.cbt.org/2013symposium.

CBT supports efforts to deliver social, economic and environmental benefits to the residents of the Columbia Basin. To learn more about CBT programs and initiatives, visit www.cbt.org or call 1-800-505-8998.

 

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