Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with the Mayor of Edmonton, Don Iveson in West block on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Friday November 29, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Edmonton mayor says he can help Trudeau deal with angry western premiers

Don Iveson meets with PM in Ottawa ahead of premiers’s meeting in Toronto

Edmonton’s mayor, who has met three times with the prime minister since election day, is pushing his fellow municipal leaders as potential mediators to smooth over relations between the federal Liberal government and angry western premiers.

Don Iveson said much of the anger on the Prairies is coming from economic uncertainty.

He said the concerns from Albertans, for instance, pointed to a need for what he called “strategic partnerships” to avoid divisiveness that is being “exploited for narrow and short-term political reasons.”

Cities, he said, could help “depolarize” some of that heated rhetoric and push for practical solutions.

Iveson said cities were best suited to play that role because they were the level of government closest to people that “has to deliver practical solutions and can’t get away with blaming others for the real complexities and challenges we’re dealing with.”

Iveson made the comments after a session in Justin Trudeau’s Parliament Hill office, which marked the latest in a series of meetings the prime minister is holding with municipal leaders as the Liberals figure out how to make their infrastructure dreams a reality — and respond to western Canadians who feel left out of the federation.

“The partnerships we’ve had in Edmonton on infrastructure, on fighting homelessness, on housing have been significant, but there’s always more to do,” Trudeau said at the start of the meeting. ”We recognize, obviously, there is real anxiety and real frustration out in Alberta from people who have been having a really tough go of it over these past years.”

That sense of alienation and frustration was amplified by the Oct. 21 federal election, which returned the Liberals to power with a minority government, but stripped them of all their seats in Saskatchewan and Alberta.

Iveson said the Liberals could alleviate some of that frustration by moving ahead with the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion — something he said the prime minister personally assured him was going to happen.

The Liberals bought the pipeline in 2018 from Kinder Morgan for $4.5 billion after the company’s investors got cold feet over ongoing political opposition that delayed work. Delays in getting it built have fuelled anger at Trudeau’s government, including legislation that Albertans blame for economic woes in the energy sector.

“When shovels go in the ground … that will quell some of the anxiety because I think they did mean it all along and it’s actually a shame that there’s still some doubt about that,” said Iveson.

READ MORE: Federal laws at heart of West’s anger up for debate, as Liberals begin outreach

Iveson said Trudeau seemed open to ideas from western mayors when it comes to economic development, which he discussed in the meeting alongside Infrastructure Minister Catherine McKenna and Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland, who is tasked with steering relations with provinces.

Premiers are set to meet next week in the Toronto area. Trudeau has been meeting with several of them since the election, including Ontario’s Doug Ford, Manitoba’s Brian Pallister and Saskatchewan’s Scott Moe.

Jordan Press, The Canadian Press

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Morning start: Numerous shipwrecks can be found below Kootenay Lake

Here is your Kootenays’ morning start for Thursday, May 28

RCMP seek public’s help in identifying suspects responsible for keying cars in Castlegar

At least three cars have been keyed in north Castlegar in the last 24 hours

Young farmers find a home through land-matching program

Young Agrarians links would-be farmers with landowners who have land to spare

Morning start: A history of the Arrow Lakes

Here is your Kootenays’ morning start for Wednesday, May 27

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

PHOTOS: Loved ones reunite at an oasis on closed U.S.-Canada border in Surrey

Officials closed the park in mid-March over coronavirus concerns

B.C.’s labour minister should look at pandemic’s financial carnage amid minimum wage increase

The timing couldn’t be worse for any government decision that drives up costs for business, writes Jock Finlayson

Feds delay national action plan for missing and murdered Indigenous women

Meanwhile, the pandemic has exacerbated the violence facing many Indigenous women and girls

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

COLUMN: Canada needs to remember rural communities as thoughts turn to pandemic recovery

Small towns often rely on tourism, which has been decimated by COVID-19

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

B.C. sees 9 new COVID-19 cases, one death as officials watch for new cases amid Phase Two

Number of confirmed active cases is at 244, with 37 people in hospital

Most Read