Photo: Unsplash

Photo: Unsplash

‘Fall back’ one hour on Sunday

Local standard time means B.C. residents gain one hour of sleep starting Sunday, Nov. 1

The Trail Times, Rossland News and Castlegar News reminds readers that Daylight Saving Time ends on Sunday, Nov. 1, when clocks are moved back one hour at 2 a.m. local daylight time, so they will then read 1 a.m. local standard time.

Meaning, there will be an extra hour of sleep on Sunday, and the days will start to get darker, earlier.

Read more: Rare full moon on Halloween

Read more: B.C. still waiting for U.S. approval to eliminate daylight saving time

Standard time is the synchronization of clocks within a geographical area or region to a single time standard, rather than using solar time or a locally chosen meridian (longitude) to establish a local mean time standard.

Generally, standard time agrees with the local mean time at some meridian that passes through the region, often near the center of the region.

Historically, the concept was established during the 19th century to aid weather forecasting and train travel.

Applied globally in the 20th century, the geographical areas became extended around evenly spaced meridians into time zones which (usually) centered on them.

The standard time set in each time zone has come to be defined in terms of offsets from Universal Time.

In regions where daylight saving time is used, that time is defined by another offset, from the standard time in its applicable time zones.

The adoption of standard time, because of the inseparable correspondence between time and longitude, solidified the concepts of halving the globe into an eastern and western hemisphere, with one prime meridian (as well its opposite International Date Line) replacing the various prime meridians that had previously been used.



newsroom@trailtimes.ca

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