ICBC is preparing to increase rates for drivers with at-fault accidents. (Black Press files)

ICBC bad driver crackdown popular with public, survey finds

Driver penalty increases expected to take effect this fall

More than 80 per cent of B.C. residents support harsher insurance rate penalties for high-risk drivers, according to results of public feedback released Thursday by the B.C. government.

Attorney General David Eby sought input into proposed changes that would see steeper ICBC rate charges for excessive speeding, impaired driving and distracted driving, as well as bigger rate increases under the penalty point system for minor driving violations.

More than 34,000 people completed an online survey on the proposed changes, with 83.4 per cent supporting the idea of at-fault drivers in crashes paying more. Increasing rates for a single serious conviction within a three-year period, rather than allowing one at-fault claim before raising rates, was supported by 74.3 per cent of respondents.

The rate increases are being submitted to the B.C. Utilities Commission, and if approved they would take effect in the fall of 2018.

The survey showed 63 per cent support for eliminating or changing ICBC’s practice of allowing customers to pay for at-fault claims out of their own pockets, to avoid an insurance claim that would push up their rate. The most popular option, with 41 per cent support, was allowing out-of-pocket payment only for vehicle damage costing $2,000 or less.

The survey also found 75 per cent support for a fee to be charged when the registered owner does not list a secondary driver who is later found at fault in a crash.

The highest support, 91.5 per cent, was for a proposed change that would see the at-fault driver, not the registered owner, penalized with higher rates after a claim.

Just Posted

MP Cannings’ long-awaited wood-use bill passes in House vote

The private member’s bill is his first to pass the House, a rare feat for rookie MPs in opposition

Castlegar water quality advisory lifted

Water quality advisory rescinded Tuesday, May 22. Turbidity levels back to normal.

Castlegar seeks input on cannabis regulation

The City will use online survey and public meetings to gather input from residents on how to move forward

City of Castlegar and Interfor receive FortisBC energy awards

Efficiency in Action Awards recognize outstanding energy efficiency projects and big energy savings.

VIDEO: Canadian Forces members begin helping out flooded B.C. communities

Three-hundred personnel in B.C. in some off hardest hit cities

Police release video on how to ‘run, hide, fight’ if there’s an active shooter

Vancouver police offer video with input from E-Comm, BC EHS, Vancouver Fire and Rescue

B.C. launches plan to tackle doctor shortage, emergency room congestion

John Horgan aims to set up regional primary care networks in a ‘team-based’ approach

Vancouver, Squamish pipeline challenges dismissed by court in B.C.

Justice Christopher Grauer ruled the province’s decision to issue the certificate was reasonable

Early learning programs for Indigenous kids get $30M boost

B.C. government to help expand Aboriginal Head Start Association programs with three-year funding

Ferry sailing cancelled after ship’s second officer falls ill

Coastal Inspiration’s 8:15 p.m. sailing to Nanaimo on Tuesday cancelled, passengers to be compensated

B.C. man recounts intense rescue of couple caught in mudslide

Something told Dan Anderson to go back to the scene of a major mudslide on the long weekend.

The priciest home for sale in Canada: A $38M Vancouver penthouse

Canada’s luxury real estate: The top 10 most expensive properties for sale right now

9 temperature records broken across B.C. as warm weather continues

Clearwater, Golden, Williams Lake, Malahat a few of the cities that broke records Wednesday

COLUMN: Stanley Cup final prediction

Upstart Vegas Golden Knights clash with Washington Capitals

Most Read