Man in his yard, mail carrier at work among Texas shooting rampage victims

People attend a vigil for victims of a shooting spree the day before, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, in Odessa, Texas. (Jacy Lewis/Reporter-Telegram via AP)People attend a vigil for victims of a shooting spree the day before, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, in Odessa, Texas. (Jacy Lewis/Reporter-Telegram via AP)
Travis Franklin and Holden Ewing carry American flags through the crowd gathered at the University of Texas Permian Basin in Odessa, Texas, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, to show their support for first responders and victims injured in Saturday’s shooting. (Ben Powell/Odessa American via AP)Travis Franklin and Holden Ewing carry American flags through the crowd gathered at the University of Texas Permian Basin in Odessa, Texas, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, to show their support for first responders and victims injured in Saturday’s shooting. (Ben Powell/Odessa American via AP)
Texas Governor Greg Abbott, right, pats Odessa Police Chief Michael Gerke, left, on the shoulder during a news conference about Saturday’s shooting, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)Texas Governor Greg Abbott, right, pats Odessa Police Chief Michael Gerke, left, on the shoulder during a news conference about Saturday’s shooting, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Law enforcement officials process a scene involved in Saturday’s shooting, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. Bullet holes are visible near the car door handle. Authorities said Sunday they still could not explain why a man with an AR-style weapon opened fire during a routine traffic stop in West Texas to begin a terrifying rampage that killed several people, injured over a dozen others and ended with officers gunning him down outside a movie theater. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)Law enforcement officials process a scene involved in Saturday’s shooting, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. Bullet holes are visible near the car door handle. Authorities said Sunday they still could not explain why a man with an AR-style weapon opened fire during a routine traffic stop in West Texas to begin a terrifying rampage that killed several people, injured over a dozen others and ended with officers gunning him down outside a movie theater. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Odessa Police Chief Michael Gerke announces that he does not want to speak the name of the shooter from Saturday’s shooting during a news conference, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. Instead, the department released the name of the gunman through a Facebook post. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)Odessa Police Chief Michael Gerke announces that he does not want to speak the name of the shooter from Saturday’s shooting during a news conference, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. Instead, the department released the name of the gunman through a Facebook post. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Celia Lopez and Sajeili Carrasco embrace before a vigil, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, in Odessa, Texas, for victims of a shooting spree the day before. (Jacy Lewis/Reporter-Telegram via AP)Celia Lopez and Sajeili Carrasco embrace before a vigil, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, in Odessa, Texas, for victims of a shooting spree the day before. (Jacy Lewis/Reporter-Telegram via AP)
Yasmin Natera and Celeste Lujan are embraced after a vigil for victims of a shooting spree the day before, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin quad, in Odessa, Texas. (Jacy Lewis/Reporter-Telegram via AP)Yasmin Natera and Celeste Lujan are embraced after a vigil for victims of a shooting spree the day before, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin quad, in Odessa, Texas. (Jacy Lewis/Reporter-Telegram via AP)
Daniel Munoz reaches for his injured back during an interview, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. Munoz was injured in Saturday’s shooting. The tattoo on his right hand is a biblical reference, that the wages of sin are death and God’s gift is everlasting life. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)Daniel Munoz reaches for his injured back during an interview, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. Munoz was injured in Saturday’s shooting. The tattoo on his right hand is a biblical reference, that the wages of sin are death and God’s gift is everlasting life. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Mail carrier Mary Granados was alone in her U.S. Postal Service truck when she was shot and killed by a gunman who hijacked the white vehicle in West Texas amid his frenzy of violence.

Granados, 29, was among seven people between the ages of 15 and 57 killed Saturday. An additional 22 were injured, including a toddler.

READ MORE: At least five dead in Texas after suspect shoots at random people, police say

U.S. Postal Service officials said in a statement Sunday that they were “shocked and saddened” by the events, but were “especially grieving the loss of our postal family member.”

The shooting began with a routine traffic stop where the gunman opened fire on police, then took off in a gold car, shooting randomly for more than 10 miles (16 kilometres). At some point during the turmoil, the gunman abandoned the car and stole the postal vehicle, killing Granados. Police finally used a marked SUV to ram the mail truck outside a movie theatre in Odessa to disable the vehicle. Police then killed the gunman.

A look at some of the other victims:

Edwin Peregrino

Peregrino, 25, ran into the yard of his parents’ Odesa home to investigate after hearing gunshots, his sister, Eritizi Peregrino, told The Washington Post. The gunman drove by the home and opened fire, killing him.

“It happened at our home. You think you’re safe at your own house,” Eritizi Peregrino, 23, said in an interview. “You’re not even safe at your own house.”

Eritizi Peregrino’s husband also was shot. She said he is recovering.

Eritizi Peregrino said her brother was home for the weekend to talk about his new job and his new life in San Antonio.

“You could always count on him for anything,” she said. “He would always help my parents and his siblings. I knew I could always rely on him and call on him.”

Leila Hernandez

Leilah, 15, was with her family Saturday as her 18-year-old brother, Nathan, picked up a truck. Nathan and Leilah were shot while walking out of the dealership, her grandmother, Nora Leyva, told the Post.

“I guess he was just looking for someone to kill,” she said.

Leyva said Leilah’s mother pushed Leilah’s 9-year-old brother under a car. Nathan wrapped his arms around Leilah and was shot in the arm. Another bullet struck Leilah near her collarbone.

Leyva said as the girl died, she pleaded: “Help me, help me.”

Leilah, an Odesa High School student, celebrated her quinceañera in May.

“It was like a dream for her,” Leyva said.

Joseph Griffith

Griffith was killed while sitting at a traffic light with his wife and two children, his oldest sister, Carla Byrne, told the Post.

“This maniac pulled up next to him and shot him, took away his life, murdered my baby brother. Like nothing,” Byrne said. “We are so broken.”

Byrne said Griffith, 40, worked six days a week to support his family. He was known for his sense of humour and an uncanny ability to impersonate people.

Griffith previously worked as a math teacher. One day before his death, a former student told Griffith what an “awesome teacher he was,” his sister said.

Daniel Munoz

Munoz, 28, who was injured, recalled the harrowing details of coming into the path of the gunman, who was later killed by officers. Munoz was in his car on the way to meet a friend for a drink, when he yielded to a car coming off Interstate 20. He noticed what he feared to be a barrel of a rifle in the hands of the driver.

“This is my street instincts: When a car is approaching you and you see a gun of any type, just get down,” Munoz, who moved from San Diego about a year ago to work in oil country, told The Associated Press. “Luckily I got down. … Sure enough, I hear the shots go off. He let off at least three shots on me.”

He’s not exactly sure, but it appears one shot hit the engine, another struck the driver’s side window and a third a rear window. Some shattered glass punctured his left shoulder, causing him to bleed a lot and go to a nearby hospital. He said he’s physically OK but bewildered by the experience.

“I’m just trying to turn the corner and I got shot — I’m getting shot at?” Munoz said. “What’s the world coming to? For real?”

Anderson Davis

Seventeen-month-old Anderson had shrapnel in her right chest and injuries to her face. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said her mother, Kelby Davis, texted: “Her mouth is pretty bad, but will heal and can be fixed. Thankfully it doesn’t seem like her jaw was hit. Just lips, teeth and tongue. … We are thanking God for healing her and appreciate continued prayers.”

A joint public statement issued by the Davis family offered thanks to emergency responders, hospital staff and “strangers who offered to help us on the street.”

Eric Finley, spokesman for UMC Health System in Lubbock, said in an email that the toddler was released from hospital Sunday.

Abbott says the girl’s mother also texted: “Toddlers are funny because they can get shot but still want to run around and play.”

Jeff Karoub, The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Reiner Jakubowski American Peony Society Registrar Nomenclature has named his latest Creation Castlegar. Photo: submitted
New peony hybrid named for Castlegar

Reiner Jakubowski has named his latest peony creation after Castlegar.

A laboratory technician holds a dose of a COVID-19 novel coronavirus vaccine candidate that’s ready for trial on monkeys at the National Primate Research Center of Thailand. (Mladen Antonov - AFP)
Interior Health reports 66 new COVID-19 infections

570 cases are active; 18 in hospital

Steppin’ Out by Argenta artists Spring Shine, Christopher Petersen and Yvonne Boyd, has won the Sculpturewalk 2020 People’s Choice Award. Photo: Sculpturewalk
Steppin’ Out wins Castlegar Sculpturewalk People’s Choice Award

The sculpture was created by Argenta artists Spring Shine, Christopher Petersen and Yvonne Boyd

The Castlegar Fire Department Stachemasters sporting their Movember mustaches. Photo: submitted
Castlegar firefighters raise almost $14,000 for Movember

The team of 16 far surpassed their fundraising goal

The Trail Smoke Eaters are practicing preparation and patience for whenever the provincial health authority gives them and the BCHL the green light to play hockey. Photo: Jim Bailey.
Trail Smoke Eaters ready and willing to play, when able

Trail Smoke Eaters staff are keeping players engaged and committed as suspension of play continues

Janet Austin, the lieutenant-governor of British Columbia, not seen, swears in Premier John Horgan during a virtual swearing in ceremony in Victoria, Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020. Horgan says he will look to fill gaps in the federal government’s sick-pay benefits program aimed at preventing the spread of COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C. premier says province prepared to patch holes in new federal sick-pay benefits

Horgan said workers should not be denied pay when they are preventing COVID-19’s spread

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s coronavirus situation at the legislature, Nov. 30, 2020. (B.C. government)
Hockey team brought COVID-19 back from Alberta, B.C. doctor says

Dr. Bonnie Henry pleads for out-of-province travel to stop

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

B.C. Premier John Horgan on a conference call with religious leaders from his B.C. legislature office, Nov. 18, 2020, informing them in-person church services are off until further notice. (B.C. government)
B.C. tourism relief coming soon, Premier John Horgan says

Industry leaders to report on their urgent needs next week

An RCMP cruiser looks on as a military search and rescue helicopter winds down near Bridesville, B.C. Tuesday, Dec. 1. Photo courtesy of RCMP Cpl. Jesse O’Donaghey
B.C. Mountie, suspect airlifted by Canadian Armed Forces from ravine after foot chase

Military aircraft were dispatched from Comox, B.C., say RCMP

An 18-year old male southern resident killer whale, J34, is stranded near Sechelt in 2016. A postmortem examination suggests he died from trauma consistent with a vessel strike. (Photo supplied by Paul Cottrell, Fisheries and Oceans Canada)
“We can do better” — humans the leading cause of orca deaths: study

B.C. research reveals multitude of human and environmental threats affecting killer whales

A logo for Netflix on a remote control is seen in Portland, Ore.,Aug. 13, 2020. Experts in taxation and media say a plan announced Monday by the government will ultimately add to the cost of digital services and goods sold by foreign companies. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Jenny Kane
‘Netflix tax’ for digital media likely to raise prices for consumers, experts say

The government says Canadian companies already collect those taxes when they make digital sales

Most Read