Much dryer, a little cooler: February saw half the normal precipitation, says SEFC

Precipitation in the form of rain was a rare thing in February

With less than half the normal precipitation, February’s weather saw the buildup of snow in the West Kootenay’s high country slow a little.

The region received less than half the normal amount of total monthly precipitation in February, says a summary from the Southeast Fire Centre.

And what was really unusual was that the precipitation falling as rain — about 90 per cent less than normal.

“Usually at this time of year we see a period of warm, moist south-westerly flow coming into the region, and February is the first winter month where we usually see more rain than snow,” says Jesse Ellis, a weather forecaster with the SEFC.

Instead, Ellis says during the month, the large-scale weather pattern frequently alternated between a ridge of high pressure and a relatively dry northwesterly flow aloft.

“The fact the dry northwesterly flow dominated through much of the month meant we didn’t have any significant events with nice, moist south or southwest flow,” he says. “And that’s where we usually pick up the more normal rainfall totals.”

Precipitation in total was about 42 per cent of normal. The month’s total snowfall (23.4cm) came to within 10 per cent of normal, while total rainfall (3.0mm) was 89 per cent below average, or, only 11 per cent of normal.”

SEE: West Kootenay snowpack reaching record levels

Other than the lack of precipitation, there wasn’t much else different about the month.

The mean monthly temperature of +0.2 was slightly above the average value of -0.1.

One odd fact: the warmest temperature of the month happened on Feb. 1. The new daily maximum temperature record of +10.8 was set on that day.

“We usually see the warmest temperatures at the end of the month,” he says, noting the high temperature is a result of atmospheric mixing that occurs after a cold front moves through an area.

“Had this [temperature] occurred the day before, on Jan. 31, it would have set a new monthly record,” says Ellis. “But since it happened on the first of February, it came up 3.5 degrees short of the monthly record of 14.3 set on the 28th in 2010.”

While big dumps of snow are still a definite possibility, spring has definitely sprung, he says.

“As we come into March we are turning the corner where the frontal systems are bringing more rain than snow,” says Ellis.



reporter@rosslandnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Hwy 1 flooding causes massive delays on certain Arrow Lakes ferry routes

Motorists have been waiting around three hours to get on ferries

Nelson cyclist run over by truck

Driver ticketed for failing to yield right of way on left turn

Flooding at Castlegar’s Millennium Park delays opening of swimming ponds

The park’s third pond rose after BC Hydro increased its discharge rates at the Keenleyside Dam

Rossland Museum and Discovery Centre expands operations online

The facility also opened back up to the public earlier in June

Castlegar Summer Reading Club program set to kickoff

The program will be held online this year due to the COVID-19 crisis

VIDEO: Musqueam Chief captures captivating footage of bald eagle catching meal

‘This is why we have chosen to live here since time immemorial,’ Chief Wayne Sparrow’s nephew says

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Liberal party finished 2019 having spent $43 million, raised $42 million

All political parties had until midnight June 30 to submit their financial reports for last year

B.C. teacher loses licence after sexual relationships with two recently-graduated students

The teacher won’t be allowed to apply for a teaching certificate until 2035

Most Read