From left to right — Prevention Services Assistant Charity Barbour

From left to right — Prevention Services Assistant Charity Barbour

Purple hats for purple crying

Some Castlegar teachers have joined forces with local Public Health Nurses to raise awareness for prevention of Shaken Baby Syndrome.

  • Oct. 30, 2014 9:00 a.m.

Betsy kline

 

Castlegar News

Some Castlegar teachers have joined forces with local Public Health Nurses to raise awareness and support for prevention of Shaken Baby Syndrome.

As part of their duties when visiting parents of new babies, public health nurses share a “Purple Crying” message.

This provides educational information about normal infant crying using the word “purple” as an acronym. Inconsolable infant crying is the number one cause of infant shaking and abuse.

The Click for Babies campaign is a program that supports the “Purple Crying” message and seeks to increase awareness and education on how to respond to prolonged crying, and the importance of never shaking your child.

Volunteer knitters and crocheters across the province “click” their needles together to create purple baby caps that will be delivered to families with newborns.

This past summer Public Health Prevention Services Assistant Charity Barbour noticed that some of the teachers on the picket lines were knitting.  She approached them about helping the Click for Babies program and soon balls of purple yarn began to appear and then disappear.

Sandra Lamont took charge of the project and not only recruited others, but also taught knitting to those who wanted to be involved, but did not know how to knit. Lamont stated, “It is a good cause.  We were able to teach new people how to knit. It was a good project for them to learn on, because it did not take a lot of expertise.”

The teachers made over 50 adorable purple caps that will be distributed locally. The public health nurses are excited that they will be able to distribute the hats that were made here on their newborn visits. Charity Barbour expressed, “I think it is awesome, it is just fantastic, that they did this.” Teachers Sandra Lamont, Barbara Archibald, Catherine McKinnon, Sasha Lasanen, Inga Lamont, and Vivan Coe will likely be looking at the babies around town a little closer than before; they will be searching to see which of their future students are adorned with tiny purple caps.

About Purple Crying

The acronym Purple stands for:

P for Peak of Crying ­— Crying peaks at around two months, then decreases at around three to five months;

U for Unexpected —  Crying comes and goes unexpectedly, for no apparent reason;

R for Resists Soothing — Crying continues despite all soothing efforts by caregivers;

P for Pain-like Face — Infants look like they are in pain, even when they are not;

L for Long Lasting — Crying can last as much as five hours a day, or more;

E for Evening — Crying occurs more in the late afternoon and evening.