Regional politicians are frustrated with the provincial government’s recyling program.

RDCK board lobbies minister on recycling

Regional board members met with environment minister Mary Polak this week.

The Regional District of Central Kootenay board has agreed to step up its lobbying of BC’s environment minister, asking her to enforce a provincial recycling law.

That law requires companies that produce paper and packaging to pay Multi Material BC to recycle paper products when they enter the waste cycle. But many companies have not signed on, even though the program has been in place for two years.

According to RDCK staff, this means its residents pay twice to have their paper and packaging recycled: once when they buy the products (whose prices have been increased to pay for recycling) and then taxes to have the RDCK process their recycling.

The RDCK would like to hand over its recycling to MMBC rather than doing it itself at a cost to local taxpayers of nearly $1 million per year

But MMBC, which provides recycling for many municipalities and regional districts across the province, says it cannot take on more because it can’t afford to, because many businesses that produce paper products in the province have not signed on.

“For us to expand we need additional businesses joining,” MMBC’s Allen Langdon told the board at their meeting last week. “There are hundreds of businesses not meeting their regulated obligations.”

MMBC provides recycling services for several local communities, including Nelson, although their presence is not obvious here because they contract curbside collection back to the city.

The RDCK board passed a resolution earlier this year to send a bill to MMBC for reimbursement of its recycling costs but did not follow up.

At the recent meeting, it was suggested the bill should be sent instead to the government because it doesn’t enforce the requirement that all paper producers join MMBC.

However the board ultimately decided that sending a bill to either party was too confrontational and that it should lobby the minister instead.

“If we slap a bill on them it will create a huge rift that we cannot repair,” said RDCK chair and Nakusp mayor Karen Hamling. “It would be better to push them to start fining these companies, and then ask them to reimburse us.”

RDCK members attending the annual Union of BC Municipalities conference this week met with environment minister Mary Polak about this.

RDCK manager Stuart Horn told the Star today that “we definitely felt heard.”

He said the minister appears to take the government’s enforcement responsibility seriously, but that she prefers to negotiate with delinquent producers rather than force them.

Also at the conference a resolution was brought to the floor by the Town of Comox asking the UBCM to urge the government to start fining companies that don’t join MMBC.

Just Posted

West Kootenay highways a mess as heavy snowfall continues

‘Roads are very icy, people have to be patient and have to slow down’

Nelson-area man wants trapping laws changed after dog killed

Louis Seguin’s 10-month-old Australian shepherd died in a body-gripping trap last month

Snowfall warning across the West Kootenay

A strong Pacific frontal system had Environment Canada issuing a snowfall advisory early Tuesday

Over $25,000 raised for Columbia Basin literacy

Success for 2018 Books for Kids campaign

Castlegar water rates set to rise for commercial, industrial users; no change for single-family homes

Multi-family residences are also likely to see a price hike in 2019

VIDEO: Close encounter with a whale near Canada-U.S border

Ron Gillies had his camera ready when a whale appeared Dec. 7

Humboldt Broncos, cannabis, Fortnite: Here are Canadians’ top Google searches for 2018

When celebrities died or Canada Post went on strike, Canada turned to Google

B.C. billionaires worth 5,845 times average middle-income household

Economists argue for changes to Canadian tax system benefitting rich

Condominium market still ‘a lot better’ than normal in Vancouver suburbs

The Fraser Valley, east of Metro Vancouver, has long been considered a more affordable haven for first-time homebuyers.

Retired B.C. teacher a YouTube Sudoku sensation

A retired Kelowna teacher has amassed quite the following online by teaching the art of solving a Sudoku puzzle.

UN chief returns as climate talks teeter closer to collapse

Predictions from international climate expert, warn that global warming is set to do irreversible environmental damage.

Trump’s willingness to intervene in Meng detention roils Canada’s justification

The International Crisis Group said Tuesday, Dec. 11 it’s aware of reports that its North East Asia senior adviser Michael Kovrig has been detained.

Scientist awarded $100K for work on Arctic contaminants that led to ban

Derek Muir has received the $100,000 Weston Family Prize for his research that showed those carcinogens were able to move into the Arctic.

Manhunt continues for France shooter

Suspected gunman named, had long police record

Most Read