An Interior Health report made public today suggests it would cost about half as much to renovate Kootenay Lake hospital as it would to replace.

UPDATED: Report card released on Kootenay hospitals

Kootenay Lake Hospital could use about $30 million worth of repairs, an Interior Health facilities study has concluded.

Nelson’s Kootenay Lake Hospital could use about $30 million worth of repairs, an Interior Health facilities study concludes.

The report summary, received last month by the West Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital District and made public today, looks at acute and residential care facilities throughout the region.

It uses a formula called facility condition index to assess each building, an industry standard that measures the physical state of a building and its systems, including mechanical, electrical and plumbing. The total cost of repairs or renovations is divided by the cost of replacement. The lower the number, the better condition the facility is in and the lesser the need for renovations.

Kootenay Lake hospital, which is 56 years old, has an estimated replacement value of $63.3 million, and a facility condition index of 0.48, meaning a thorough overhaul would cost about $30 million.

By comparison, Kootenay Boundary regional hospital in Trail is 60 years old, has a replacement value of $83.6 million, and a condition index of 0.53, so it could use a $44 million investment.

Nelson mayor John Dooley, who is also the city’s hospital district representative, said he wasn’t surprised that there are big infrastructure deficits, but learning the actual costs was “a wake-up call” and “like a sledgehammer.”

“We’ve got some serious challenges ahead of us,” he said. “We probably knew in the back of our minds that work needed to be done, but now we have numbers attached and it’s staggering.”

However, Dooley was optimistic it could be addressed: “Nothing’s impossible if you have a plan. It will take political will and a long-term commitment, but it can be done.”

He also said that despite the amount of work required, it’s not as though Kootenay Lake hospital has been neglected, pointing to the new emergency room that opened last year.

Two smaller hospitals fared better in the assessment: Arrow Lakes hospital in Nakusp, which is 38 years old, has a replacement value of $14.1 million and an index of 0.31, so the price tag on repairs is about $4.3 million. Boundary hospital in Grand Forks, which is 50 years old, is worth $36.4 million and had an index of 0.32, suggesting it requires $11.6 million in capital improvements.

Castlegar’s community health centre had a replacement value of $32.6 million, and a facilities index of 0.41, which works out to a wish list of upgrades worth $13.4 million; Slocan community health centre in New Denver was pegged at a value of $16.3 million and a facilities index of 0.37, equal to $6 million in potential work; and Kaslo’s Victorian community health centre is worth $12.4 million and has an index of 0.49, so it would also cost $6 million to fully renovate.

The numbers do not include things like taxes, architectural fees, equipment, or furniture.

The study, completed in September, also looked at long-term care facilities: those in the best shape include Hardy View Lodge in Grand Forks, which was rebuilt five years ago, and Talarico Place in Castlegar. On the other end of the scale, Poplar Ridge Pavilion in Trail had an index of 0.61, indicating that it needs up to $11.6 million in renovations.

The complete list of assessments can be found here.

Although intended to help guide capital investment decisions, the summary does not make any explicit recommendations around which facilities should be repaired or replaced first, nor about where new facilities should be built.

“The demand for capital needs will continue to outweigh funding levels,” it reads. “The [facilities condition index is] only one component of a process used to determine capital investment priorities.”

Other factors include whether a facility is providing the right services; whether it’s able to accommodate current volume and growth; whether it’s adaptable to current standards; and whether it’s able to meet clinical and program needs, the summary stated.

Interior Health declined to comment on the report until it’s discussed at a hospital district meeting next Wednesday in Castlegar.

The hospital district is responsible for paying 40 per cent of approved capital projects while the provincial government and hospital foundations pick up the rest.

Just Posted

Castlegar wildlife conflicts down in 2018, though problems persist

Official Bear Smart Community status still elusive for city

How long can Castlegar support a repertory cinema?

Cinema owners find audiences with older, obscure movies

Castlegar Search and Rescue gets early Christmas gift

Boston Pizza donated $1,107 to local search and rescue group

Castlegar family in need of ‘Christmas miracle’ to treat 4 year old’s diabetes

All Jack Sekel wants for Christmas is a monitor that neither insurance or government will provide.

KBRH on watch for bed bugs after two recent cases

Spokesperson Mandy Lowery says there has not been a bed bug sighting at KBRH since Dec. 8

Trudeau to make it harder for future PM to reverse Senate reforms

Of the 105 current senators, 54 are now independents who have banded together in Independent Senators’ Group

Man dies after falling from B.C. bridge

Intoxicated man climbed railing, lost his balance and fell into the water below

B.C. animation team the ‘heart’ of new ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’

The animators, largely based in Vancouver, ultimately came up with a creative technique that is drawing praise

LETTER: Postal workers’ constitutional rights violated

“Constitutional rights should not be violated out of expediency” says letter writer.

Light at the end of the tunnel for UN climate talks

Meeting in Katowice was meant to finalize how countries report their emissions of greenhouses gases

Janet Jackson, Def Leppard, Nicks join Rock Hall of Fame

Radiohead, the Cure, Roxy Music and the Zombies will also be ushered in at the 34th induction ceremony

Supreme Court affirms privacy rights for Canadians who share a computer

Section 8 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects Canadians against unreasonable search and seizure

B.C. fire chief pleads with Ottawa for traumatic stress support

Campbell River fire chief Thomas Doherty presented concerns to federal government

21 detained before Paris protests as police deploy in force

There was a strong police presence outside the central Saint Lazare train station, where police in riot gear checked bags

Most Read