Logging trucks gather from around the B.C. Interior to head to downtown Vancouver, Sept. 27, 2019. (B.C. Logging Convoy/Facebook)

B.C. VIEWS: Rural B.C. takes another hit from the NDP

Province showing clear signs it’s heading for deficits

The annual Union of B.C. Municipalities convention is usually a non-event for cosmopolitan Vancouver. A little more downtown congestion added to the cruise ship traffic, an extra bump in already high hotel prices, more demand for taxis.

It’s usually a yawner for the city media too, lots of rural problems and dry financial discussions. That changed briefly last week, as a convoy of hundreds of logging trucks descended on the downtown convention centre, from as far north as Prince George and down through the Cariboo and Okanagan-Similkameen. They honked and rolled for hours, getting brief attention from TV cameras.

The industry doesn’t seem very organized, one urban observer said. I replied that “the industry” in this case is out-of-work independent contractors spending hundreds of dollars they need for their next truck payment on fuel to stage the demonstration. With Premier John Horgan and his entire cabinet in town, they went for it.

The forest industry crisis was the talk of the convention, as small-town mayors and councillors arrived knowing the province had suspended a $25 million “rural dividend” grant program to fund relief for Interior communities that have lost their mills. The money is to bridge older workers to retirement and retrain others, as well as give grants to Quesnel, Chasm, Vavenby and Fort St. James to offer assistance.

Government’s response to a wave of sawmill and logging layoffs has been slow and clumsy, capped by Horgan’s comments to reporters after his convention-closing speech. He compared community leaders wanting the rural fund reinstated to kids who “want everything right now.”

RELATED: Rural dividend program only ‘curtailed,’ Horgan says

RELATED: Log truck convoy stalls traffic in downtown Vancouver

The $25 million was for small grants to diversify rural economies, many in towns that lost their forest employment a while ago. No example is more poignant than Port McNeill and its neighbouring villages. You don’t have to explain to Winter Harbour and other North Island communities what it’s like to lose a once-vibrant economy.

Port McNeill Mayor Gaby Wickstrom says her town’s grant application was a mere $10,000 to spruce up the downtown. She also serves on the board of Mount Waddington Regional District, which had one of the hundreds of “rural dividend” applications awaiting approval. Theirs was around $200,000 for a non-profit society to run its “fundamentals of forestry” project.

That would pay for a staffer to recruit people to move to the North Island. “Not just workers, bringing people to our region, the quality of life, why to live here, why to invest here, that kind of thing,” Wickstrom told me. “Port Alice had an application in as well, for some signage. They’re trying to reinvent themselves after the mill closure.”

The long-dormant pulp mill there was officially shuttered in February, its small maintenance crew laid off.

The NDP government has looked desperate on the forest crisis, suspending its caribou protection plan, appointing an apologist MLA to go on yet another listening tour, and then this horribly short-sighted cancellation of a modest diversification program.

And while $25 million provides a hand up for some little towns, it’s a drop in the bucket for Finance Minister Carole James. She just moved $300 million from contingency funds, basically an unused wildfire budget that came in handy to keep the province out of red ink for this year.

There’s still more than $400 million in contingency this year, but Horgan confirmed that all ministries are looking for cuts. Their big inherited surplus has been spent.

Tom Fletcher is B.C. legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press Media. Email: tfletcher@blackpress.ca


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

VIDEO: Holiday Train rocks into Castlegar

Terri Clark and Dallas Smith entertained Castlegar Thursday night.

RCMP: Appledale homicide investigation still active

A 59-year-old man was found dead on May 20

SOWK MP unsurprised by Scheer resignation

“It’s a very tough job being a leader of a party, and we thanked him for that service,” - MP Cannings

Promoter fundraises for new Kootenay Country Music Fest

UPDATED: Travis Pangburn has de-activated the $150,000 Gofundme campaign

RDCK appoints new regional fire chief

Nora Hannon has been acting head of the fire service since the old chief’s departure in the summer

VIDEO: More air-passenger rights go into effect this weekend

The first set of passenger rights arrived in mid-July in Canada

Swoop airlines adds three destinations in 2020 – Victoria, Kamloops, San Diego

Low-fair subsidiary of WestJet Airlines brings new destinations in April 2020

Aid a priority for idled Vancouver Island loggers, John Horgan says

Steelworkers, Western Forest Products returning to mediation

Navigating ‘fever phobia’: B.C. doctor gives tips on when a sick kid should get to the ER

Any temperature above 38 C is considered a fever, but not all cases warrant a trip to the hospital

Transportation Safety Board finishes work at B.C. plane crash site, investigation continues

Transport Canada provides information bulletin, family of victim releases statement

Trudeau sets 2025 deadline to remove B.C. fish farms

Foes heartened by plan to transition aquaculture found in Fisheries minister mandate letter

Wagon wheels can now be any size! B.C. community scraps 52 obsolete bylaws

They include an old bylaw regulating public morals

Indigenous mother wins $20,000 racial discrimination case against Vancouver police

Vancouver Police Board ordered to pay $20,000 and create Indigenous-sensitivity training

Sentencing for B.C. father who murdered two young daughters starts Monday

The bodies of Aubrey, 4, and Chloe, 6, were found in Oak Bay father’s apartment Dec. 25, 2017

Most Read