LETTERS: Two views of the Castlegar Complex referendum

One urges moving forward, one says failed referendum reason to vote against proportional representat

Time to heal recreation wound

After attending the regional recreation commission meeting on July 3, I came away with food for thought. Although the result of the referendum was disappointing to me and appeared to be to the representatives of Castlegar and Area J, as well as staff members, I hope they will rally on and bring this forward in the near future.

I am sure many of the negative voters in all areas did not want a raise in their taxes. This is their right.

But mostly, I wish to thank director Andy Davidoff of Area I for bringing to light one of the reasons his region voted so overwhelming in the negative. The message I received is that there is a deep-seated feeling of resentment stemming back to the referendum to build the pool originally, as well as a feeling of not getting their fair share of money and amenities proposed within the region.

I think it is time to heal this wound. Let’s think about the situation and bring suggestions to the commission. I will start the ball rolling with one: Run a free bus from at least the Playmor Junction to the recreation complex, Monday to Friday, to arrive before 9 a.m. and leave at noon (when many adult activities take place), and afternoons on the weekends, so residents of Area I can more easily partake of the activities at the complex. Now, what is your idea?

Marilyn Johnstone

Castlegar

Arena vote

reflects provincial picture

It’s extremely disappointing that a small majority who don’t even live in the immediate community can vote down a project (a new arena) that is desperately needed by the largest group of physically active people (the ice users) in our area and approved overall by a majority of the voters.

Very similar to what prevails in the province now with a small group of MLAs (the three Greens) running the agenda of the NDP, stopping the pipeline and other projects to which the majority of British Columbians approve.

Probably the same will occur if we get proportional representation. Small groups of radicals may obtain enough support to get their own MLA(s) to vote down anything that most of us might want.

I will definitely be voting no this coming fall to any form of proportional representation and yes to keeping our current voting system.

Gord Gibson

Castlegar

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