Our View: Election coverage

Elections are both a boon and a curse to the newsroom; election coverage is a double-edged sword.

Elections are both a boon and a curse to the newsroom. Whether you are writing for a big city daily or a community newspaper, election coverage is a double-edged sword.

The question that must always be answered is how do you decipher what is legitimate news, community news or campaign propaganda? You also have to ensure you are treating every candidate as equal as possible.

And the candidates, as well as their supporters, don’t make it easy.

As part of the campaign, potential politicians are everywhere. Local meetings and events that may not normally attract a huge crowd, will see attendance double as candidates and their promotional teams mingle, network and push their platforms.

Then there are the passive photo bomb attempts.

Neutral coverage is a difficult task when everyone is either jumping into the photo op or wearing promotional buttons or carrying literature for a particular candidate.

Add to that the letters to the editor which increase in frequency and contain underlying political messages. While not written by the candidates themselves, they are frequently sent by a supporter or campaign manager.

For editors, it becomes a mine field of what should, and more importantly what shouldn’t, run.

The real fear is will actual news events be missed due to an over infatuation with fairness?

The fact is, incumbents have an advantage because, they are already in the public eye.

Council meetings will still get covered because, simply enough, news is still news.

Media will continue to cover newsworthy events, while trying to avoid unnecessary promotion.

We remain neutral, but just as important, we remain news reporters.

 

Just Posted

South Slocan woman killed in Friday crash

Police continue to investigate cause of fatal crash

Castlegar’s Stanley Humphries School’s got talent

Talent show to be held Feb. 21 at Brilliant Cultural Centre

What’s Up: Things to see and do on Family Day

There’s plenty of fun to be had across the West Kootenay this coming long weekend!

Province announces $23 million for upgrades at Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital

West Kootenay-Boundary Regional Hospital District Board has yet to review the provincial proposal

Selkirk College Saints score pair of crucial wins

Stellar goaltending and timely goals lead to victory over the Vancouver Island University Mariners.

Trudeau’s principal secretary, Gerald Butts, resigns amid SNC-Lavalin furor

Butts categorically denies the accusation that he or anyone else in the PMO improperly pressured former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould

Ammonia leak shuts down curling club in Nelson

It’s not yet clear when the leak was detected

Lost a ring? This B.C. man will find it for you

Chris Turner founded The Ring Finders, an international directory of metal detector hobbyists

Poverty coalition has high hopes for B.C. poverty reduction strategy

Funding allocation expected to be released with 2019 budget

East Kootenay mine deaths prompt safety initiatives

Teck produces educational video, introduces new procedures after contractor drowns at Fording River

‘How did we get here?’: B.C. mom of transplant recipient worries about measles outbreaks

Addison, 7, cannot get a live vaccine because she has a heart transplant

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh calls for public inquiry over SNC-Lavalin questions

Vancouver member of Parliament Jody Wilson-Raybould resigned from cabinet last week

Canadian airlines waiting for guidance from Ottawa over X gender option

Major U.S. airlines said they will change their process so passengers can identify themselves along non-binary lines

Moose Hide campaign takes message to Canadian schools

Campaign launches new K-12 education platform

Most Read