Signs needed no additions

Citizen disappointed by visual clutter of public space

While visiting North Vancouver recently, I was heartened to see how Edward Mahon’s legacy of parkland development has been embraced by the City and his contribution to the welfare of its current citizens is being recognized. I was especially struck by how the city planners managed to blend the natural landscapes with developed paths, formal gardens, and artistic enterprises. This is true of a purely natural park such as Mahon Park, as well as of formally landscaped parks such as Victoria Park and the Grand Boulevard.

Castlegar, on the other hand, seems to have lost much of that vision. What should be our greatest parkland asset is getting more and more of that Coney Island look to it. I was asked to develop a series of interpretive signs for the Millennium Walkway; the result were state-of-the-art panels that showcase local history in a unique way, have the appearance of genuine artwork, and are very durable. Although they are at times targeted by vandals, they hold up well.

It is distressing to see that effort watered down by the installation of similar sign panels which are basically propaganda signs and which clash with the historical sequence. I think if it is necessary to provide advisory information on sponsors or management techniques, it could be done in a more modest way, so as not to compete with the more valuable assets of the park.

By far the worst, however, is the clutter of advisory signs which range from being irritating to plain idiotic. The latest addition is a NO LOITERING sign. What on earth is a park for then? I honestly believe these predominantly negative signs raise feelings of resentment and encourage vandalism which then spreads to other features of the park.

It was heartening to see the Welcome to Castlegar signs relocated and ‘uncluttered’ from the meaningless tack-ons. Perhaps we could use such a rigorous approach on the Millennium Walkway.

 

Walter Volovsek,

Castlegar

Just Posted

City of Castlegar treating weeds the next few weeks

City will be using organic product on sidewalks, traffic islands and parking lots.

Summer reading fun at Castlegar library

Registration for second session in July 19.

Last stop: The inside story of Queen City Shuttle and Charters’ closure

Former employees open up about the Nelson company’s final days

Craft cannabis development planned for Castlegar

Plans are underway for one of the first craft cannabis industrial parks in the province.

Fashion Fridays: 5 casual summer dress styles

Kim XO, helps to keep you looking good on Fashion Fridays on the Black Press Media Network

Clock’s ticking to share how you feel about Daylight Saving Time in B.C.

Provincial public survey ends at 4 p.m. on Friday

Couple found dead along northern B.C. highway in double homicide

Woman from the U.S. and man from Australia found dead near Liard Hot Springs

Trudeau announces $79M investment for 118 more public transit buses across B.C.

Contributions from municipal to federal level to fund more buses in a bid to cut commutes

Justin Trudeau’s carbon footprint revealed in ranking of world leaders

Travel company ranks 15 world leaders’ foreign flight CO2 emissions

B.C. First Nation’s group using ads in Texas targeting company for fuel spill

The Heiltsuk Tribal Council has called out Kirby Corporation for the Nathan E. Stewart oil spill

B.C. woman wins record $2.1 million on casino slot machine

‘That night was so surreal … I wasn’t able to sleep or eat for the first two days,’ she said

West Kootenay U16 Rebels take home provincial gold

West Kootenay Rebels fastball team battle hard to win the BC U16C Fastball Championship

After B.C. dad’s death, Technical Safety BC wants changes to trampoline park rules

Jay Greenwood, 46, did ‘a series of acrobatic manoeuvres prior to a fall that caused serious injury and cardiac arrest’

Most Read