Chris Hadfield stands on the red carpet as he Is inducted into 2018 Canada Walk of Fame during a press red carpet event in Toronto on Saturday December 1, 2018. Hadfield’s next adventure will be set in the far-off world of space fiction. Random House Canada announced on Tuesday that Hadfield’s debut novel, “The Apollo Murders,” is scheduled to hit shelves on Oct. 12.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Chris Hadfield stands on the red carpet as he Is inducted into 2018 Canada Walk of Fame during a press red carpet event in Toronto on Saturday December 1, 2018. Hadfield’s next adventure will be set in the far-off world of space fiction. Random House Canada announced on Tuesday that Hadfield’s debut novel, “The Apollo Murders,” is scheduled to hit shelves on Oct. 12.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Astronaut Chris Hadfield draws from real-life space thrills in debut novel

Hadfield says the thriller will be rooted in the “little-known reality” of the Cold War-era space race

Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield’s next adventure will be set in the far-off world of space fiction.

Random House Canada announced on Tuesday that Hadfield’s debut novel, “The Apollo Murders,” is scheduled to hit shelves on Oct. 12.

In a statement, Hadfield says the thriller will be rooted in the “little-known reality” of the Cold War-era space race, and will feature characters both real and imagined.

Random House Canada says the story centres on a NASA crew racing against their Soviet rivals to reach the far side of the moon, but someone on-board the Apollo module has “murder on the mind.”

The publisher says the plot’s twists and turns will be enriched by Hadfield’s real-life knowledge of the otherworldly thrills of terrors of space flight.

The former commander of the International Space Station already has a proven track record as a bestselling author, with previous titles including “An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth,” “You Are Here” and children’s book “The Darkest Dark.”

The Canadian Press


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